Ozone Therapy – Moncton & Dieppe

Dr. Melissa Blake is certified in ozone therapy. She received her advanced training at the certification course offered by world leader in the field, Dr. Frank Shallenberger, MD.

The following is an excerpt from Dr. Shallenberger’s website:

Ozone therapy is a unique form of therapy that both heals and detoxifies at the same time. It is used to treat a variety of chronic diseases, including:

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Cancer (as part of an integrative plan, ozone has been shown to improve response to conventional treatments, reduce side effects, and improve outcomes)
  • Diabetes
  • Lyme disease
  • Chronic hepatitis
  • Herpes and other stubborn viral infections
  • Chronic fatigue states
  • Chemical sensitivity
  • Macular degeneration
  • Chronic bladder conditions
  • Inflammatory bowel diseases
  • Auto-immune diseases

What is Ozone?

The oxygen you breathe is present in the air as a pair of oxygen atoms. This is the most stable form of oxygen, and it’s colorless. Ozone is a blue colored form of oxygen (it’s what makes the sky blue), and unlike regular oxygen, it is composed of three oxygen atoms instead of two.It is the addition of the third oxygen atom that makes ozone “supercharged” oxygen, and gives it all of its remarkable medical properties.

The use of ozone to treat various medical conditions was first developed in Germany in the early 1950’s. Today, medical ozone therapy is common throughout Europe, and its use has gradually been spreading in America over the last 25 years.

Ozone is toxic, isn’t it?

Anything, including water and oxygen, is toxic if given in amounts that exceed the body’s capacity to utilize it. Ozone is found naturally in the body. The white cells make it as part of the immune response.Pure medical grade ozone, when it is used according to the established medical guidelines, has a safety record that is unparalleled.

Medical properties of ozone:

Ozone has five properties that account for why it works so well not only for macular degeneration, but also for most other chronic age related conditions as well:

  1. Ozone is a potent regulator of the immune system. This means that when the immune system is overactive (as in auto-immune disease), ozone will calm it down. Conversely, when the immune system is under active as in cancer, AIDS, and chronic infections, ozone will stimulate it. This unique ability of ozone stems from its action on the membranes of white cells that causes them to produce immune related messenger molecules called cytokines. Examples of cytokines are gamma interferon, interleukin-2, colony stimulating factor, and TNF-alpha just to name a few.
  2. Ozone stimulates increased uptake of oxygen by stimulating the enzyme diphosphoglycerate (DPG). DPG enables the release of oxygen from the hemoglobin molecule so that it can be taken up into the cell.In the absence of an adequate amount of DPG, our cells become starved for oxygen.This is a common problem in diabetics.
  3. Ozone improves circulation. It does this by enhancing the flow characteristics of blood as a liquid. This effect enables more of the oxygen carrying hemoglobin to reach the capillaries where ultimately the cells will receive more of the oxygen they require. Many patients with chronic inflammatory conditions have impaired circulation.
  4. Ozone increases antioxidant protection more than any other therapy including vitamin C. Most people with chronic disease have deficient antioxidant defenses.
  5. Ozone is a powerful mitochondrial stimulant. The fundamental underlying cause behind all degenerative disease from diabetes to heart disease to cancer is decreased mitochondrial energy production. Ozone can often correct this problem.

How is ozone used medically?

Ozone therapy should only be used by professionals who have been fully trained in its use. Doctors who want such training can receive it from Dr. Shallenberger, who offers training sessions twice a year in the United States and internationally.

Autotherapy is the most common, and in most cases the most effective way ozone is administered. The patient sits in a chair and has from 6-12 ounces of blood removed into a sterilized bottle.Then ozone is injected into the bottle, and the bottle is gently shaken, allowing the red and white blood cells to take up the ozone. The ozonated blood is then returned to the body. The entire procedure takes about 30-40 minutes.

Is ozone for me?

This is a decision for a doctor who is trained and experienced in the medical use of ozone. Some conditions simply will not clear up unless ozone is used, and of course many conditions will clear up without ozone. Because of its many therapeutic properties, ozone can be used as part of a therapeutic plan for almost every disease.

It is invaluable in the treatment of heart disease and circulatory disorders.Chronic infections such as hepatitis-C, herpes, Lyme, and AIDS respond very favorably to ozone.It is also very helpful in chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and autoimmune diseases.

It is important to realize that ozone therapy is not a panacea or some kind of magic bullet. Although it is often an indispensable modality, it is only rarely effective by itself. In the great majority of cases it must be combined with an individualized program of other alternative and natural therapies, such as nutrition and detoxification.

 

For more information or to book a consultation to discuss your medical options, please call 506-857-1300.

It’s all about the TERRAIN

Any gardener knows that simply cutting the top off a weed won’t stop it from growing back. It actually creates a vicious cycle that lead to very resistant weeds.

The same is true in the human body.

Most of us have been taught that germs cause disease. But another theory, known at the terrain theory, suggests that it’s not the germ but the state of our “internal environment” that determines health.

This is why when you’re well rested, eating well, and energized you tend to get sick less often or at least get over an infection quickly. If you’ve had a stressful week, didn’t get much sleep, and have been snacking on refined foods – the likelihood of becoming sick is much higher. Yes, germs are part of the disease process, but we are more or less susceptible to illness depending on the state of our terrain.

At the end of his life, Louis Pasteur, the scientist who developed the germ theory, is quoted to have said: “the microbe is nothing; the milieu is everything.”

To be healthy, we need to tend to our soil.

5 essential ways to support a healthy (and disease resistant) terrain:

#1. Sleep

An absolutely underrated aspect of a healthy lifestyle is adequate, good quality sleep.

Tips for healthy sleep:

  • sleep in the dark
  • set consistent bed and wake times (ideally between 10pm-11am to bed and rise with the sun)
  • avoid stimulation 1-2 hours before bedtime, especially from electronics

#2. Nutrition

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT. Nutrient depleted, refined, processed foods are healthy terrain enemies. Focus on lots of low-glycemic fruits and vegetables, good quality protein, and healthy fats.

#3. Support balanced gut flora

Many infection are related to “opportunistic organisms” – they are always around but don’t flourish until there is opportunity to do so. Supporting a good balance of healthy gut flora will keep these unwanted bugs in check and also support optimal digestion.

  • consume fermented foods such as kimchi, kombucha, kefir, and sauerkraut
  • eat a diet high in fibre to fuel and support good bacteria
  • speak with a naturopathic doctor about a probiotic supplement

#4. Reduce toxins

Toxins create inflammation and oxidative damage. Try to avoid what you can as well as support your detox pathways to ensure you optimize the health of your terrain.

  • sweat it out! use infrared saunas and exercise to mobilize and eliminate toxins thru your sweat
  • reduce pesticides by using the ewg.org list of least and most contaminated crops
  • stop putting toxins on your body and opt for safe, natural body care products (drop in and check out the options)
  • speak to a naturopathic doctor about detox support

#5. Manage stress

I cannot “stress” this enough! Do what you can to eliminate unnecessary stress and then work to change your point of view about the rest of it. Herbs, meditation, exercise, acupuncture, counselling, prayer, yoga therapy, laughter, and breathing techniques are all effective stress management options.

 

 

The World of Bacteria – Harmful and Helpful

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Did you know there are more bacteria on earth than there are stars in the universe?

Scientists from the University of Georgia estimate the number of bacteria on our planet to be five million trillion trillion – that’s a five with 30 zeroes after it.

That makes them something to talk about.

We typically think of bacteria in a negative light – they cause infections such as strep throat, food poisoning, and Lyme.

But thankfully not all bugs (not even most) are bad.

In fact, many are essential to keeping us, and the planet we live on, alive. We have many species of helpful bacteria living in our digestive tracts and on our skin that help support digestion and are an essential part of our immune system.

This month we are exploring all things bacterial, including what we can do to support a healthy relationship with the bugs we like and resist the ones we don’t.

 

 

 

 

A Month Of Connection

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The Importance of Connection

This month we are exploring the benefits of connection; connection with others, food, nature, and of course with self!

I recently attended my uncle’s 60th birthday party. We have always been a tight family, especially the cousins, but with aging parents I couldn’t avoid asking the question of whether or not we would still be spending time together when we are celebrating our own 60th’s.

My younger (and seemingly wiser) cousins were quick to remind me that all relationships take effort and if we want to still have connection in 20, 30, or 40 years from now we “have to try!”

This is the message I want to convey this month – connection takes effort. It’s a choice. We need to be mindful of taking time out of our busy schedules to feel connected. The research suggests that by doing so, we can all lead healthier, happier, and longer lives!

This month I hope you slow down and taste your food; I hope you get on the floor and play with your children and grandchildren; I hope you spend a few moments here and there tuning in to what’s happening in your body below the shoulders; I hope you hug a tree. (Yep! I said it. I’m into hugging trees. It’s probably about time I fully adopt the naturopathic, crunchy-granola identity!)

So please come along with us on this journey of connection. Follow our Facebook page for empowering tips and tools to help deepen the many areas of your life that will benefit from connecting.

Cheers to a month of mindful connection!

Happy healing,

Dr. Melissa Blake

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The Nutritional Change You Can’t Live Without

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I often tell my patients when it comes to things that are good for you more is not necessarily better….except when it comes to veggies!

If there is one nutritional recommendation that outlasts all the crazy diet fads and fits into every tailored nutritional plan it is to EAT MORE VEGGIES!

Eating more vegetables is one of the simplest dietary choices with the most profound health benefits.

Vegetables are nutrient dense – providing a good dose of vitamins, minerals, and other phytonutrients in every serving. The plant chemicals not only prevent disease but promote optimal health!

Veggies also tend to be high fibre foods. Fibre helps to reduce blood sugar spikes, promotes healthy bowel movements, and balances cholesterol levels.

Studies have shown that people who eat more veggies have lower rates of stroke, diabetes and heart disease. These same veggie loving folks are more likely to maintain healthy body weight, which is linked to a reduction of several different chronic disease rates.

When it comes to cancer, veggies pack a preventative punch. Sarah Toule, from the World Cancer Research Fund, says: “Research shows just how incredibly important vegetables and fruit are as part of a healthy diet. In fact, they’re essential for maintaining a healthy weight, which our own evidence has shown reduces the risk of 11 common cancers.”

Here are a few suggestions to help you increase your veggie intake to help you feel your best and stay that way!


#1.

Soups and Stews: When vegetables are in chili, soups, and stews, they get really soft and the flavours all blend together. Think about a pot of chicken noodle soup: there are loads of vegetables in this soup and even the pickiest eaters love it. So when you’re making your next batch of chilli, soup, or stew why not throw in an extra serving of veggies (or two). The idea is to get creative, cut veggies up small and add in a variety of different veggies or consider pureed options like this delicious cauliflower soup!

 

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 #2.

Availability: Make sure the veggies are on hand and available. When you or your child is hungry and open the fridge to get a snack and there are baby carrots, celery sticks, salsa and guacamole, you’ll be more tempted to eat veggies for your snack!

 


#3.

Super Sneaky Smoothies: Hide vegetables in smoothies. Leafy greens blend up nicely and, if paired with berries and 1/2 banana, they won’t change the taste – only the health benefits! Cooked greens are also a great addition to smoothies! Why not have some fun with your blender. A few to try: cucumber, cooked kale, baby spinach, and beets.


#4.

Change the Texture! Dehydrate or bake veggies so that they are crunchy and chip or french fry-like. Kale chips are always a hit, but you also make homemade sweet potato fries, cauliflower steaks, plantain chips, and even green bean fries. We love turnip fries at our house and you could use this recipe for any root veggie 🙂

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#5.

Sauces and Dips Galore: If you or your child don’t like vegetables plain, consider them instead as a vehicle for awesome dips and sauces. Hummus is versatile and tasty, but rather than eat it with pita or crackers, try baby carrots, cucumber, or red bell peppers. If salads are boring you to death, maybe you need to explore some new salad dressings to jazz up the salad scene. You can also make your own pasta sauce with lots of yummy veggies. Chunky or pureed, mild or spicy are options that can be made depending on what you like.

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#6.

Weekly New Veggie Challenge: Commit to one new vegetable a week. Baby steps, right? One veggie at a time might be a good way to ease into a more vegetable-rich diet. They say that kids need to be exposed to a new food ten times before they really know if they like it or not (and most of the time after ten tries they end up liking it)! So don’t give up if you don’t like something on the first try 😉


#7.

Pureed Power: When a vegetable is pureed, you can easily “sneak it” in to increase the nutritional value of the dishes you normally like. Pureed veggies obviously can be added to soups and stews, but also pasta sauces, gravies, salad dressings, casseroles, and even used in baking. One of our family favourites is a take on the Oh She Glows cheese sauce which we made a couple of tweaks to and love it in a mac’n cheese. Serve it with a tossed salad and your getting a few servings of veggies in one meal!

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#8.

Drink your veggies: One super efficient way to get in a good dose of veggies is to drink ’em! When you consume fresh-made juice, it’s like getting an infusion of the vitamins, minerals and plant chemicals (phytonutrients) found in the whole plant. Make juicing part of your regular diet to benefit from a wide variety of plant nutrients.

*If you live in the Moncton area, check out JUICD! They are currently offering weekly delivery of fresh-made juices to your door.


#9.

More of what you do like: If you really, really can’t seem to eat more veggies and you’ve tried all of my suggestions, then focus on which vegetables you or your child actually do like and increase the consumption of those veggies. Even if the veggie diet isn’t varied, the benefit will come from having more vegetables on a regular basis.


#10.

Focus on Fruits: And my last suggestion, if it’s a constant fight to eat vegetables but you or your child love fruits, then focus on eating a wide variety of fruits. The one downside to eating too many fruit is the high sugar content (even though it is ‘natural’ sugar, sugar is still sugar and contributes to health concerns when consumed in excess). But, fruits are still loaded in vitamins, water, and fiber, so if you can’t do a lot of vegetables, try to at least get some more fruit in the diet…and maybe start working on blending in some veggies using the suggestions above 😉


#11 (cause who could stop at 10??)

Buy Local. Imagine bitting into a crunchy carrot and the smell alone makes your mouth water..Or a crisp cucumber that leaves juice running down your chin..How about making a delicious salad and the lettuce is so crisp and tasty you don’t even need dressing? Those are the kinds of flavours and textures you get when your food is fresh. BUY LOCAL. It’s just better!

IV Vitamin C for Cancer Care

*Modified from OICC Patient Resource*

 

Did you know IV Vitamin C therapy can be combined with conventional cancer treatments?

What is intravenous vitamin C (IVC)?

High doses of vitamin C are administered via an intravenous (IV) drip. The IV route allows much larger concentrations of vitamin C to circulate in the blood than is possible by taking oral vitamin C supplements. Often high doses of oral vitamin C cause digestive upset and diarrhea and cannot achieve high enough blood levels to have a cancer benefit.

What is IVC used for?

IVC is most commonly prescribed to:

  •   improve quality of life
  •   reduce cancer-treatment related symptoms including fatigue, nausea and lack of appetite
  •   slow cancer progression

Does IVC work?

Most research has been conducted in the lab, using cells and animal models. Human studies are limited. Preliminary human studies, however, consistently show that IVC, alone or in combination with standard treatments, can reduce cancer symptoms, treatment side effects and improve quality of life. IVC should not be considered as a cure for cancer but as a powerfully beneficial aspect of an integrative plan.

A few small studies have looked at IVC in combination with standard care. In line with results from lab studies, these human studies show that IVC plus chemotherapy can slow cancer progression by reducing tumour size and decreasing tumour growth rate, as compared to chemotherapy alone.

How does IVC work?

Studies indicate IVC increases the production of hydrogen peroxide in the blood stream, which has been shown to cause cancer cell death while leaving normal cells unharmed. As opposed to vitamin C taken orally, vitamin C administered through an IV behaves as a pro-oxidant rather than an anti-oxidant and leads to the generation of free-radicals. Cancer cells do not have the necessary enzymes to breakdown hydrogen peroxide, causing the cancer cell to die.

Cancer cell lines that have exhibited sensitivity to the high doses of vitamin C that are possible through IV delivery include lymphoma, glioblastoma, bladder, prostate, liver, breast, cervix, ovary, colon and pancreas.

What are the side effects of IVC?

Side effects are mild and rare in most patients. Possible examples include diarrhea, loss of appetite, abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, headache or mouth.

Is IVC safe?

Under most conditions, absolutely yes. However, IVC should not be administered to patients with renal failure, a history of kidney stone formation or those with a deficiency of the G6PD enzyme. Please contact Dr. Melissa Blake to discuss whether you are a good candidate for IVC therapy.

What is the recommended dose of IVC?

The goal of IVC treatment is to achieve a level of vitamin C in the blood stream of approximately 22mM (400mg/dL). My patients typically receive between 30g and 80g per infusion to achieve these levels. Extensive data show that doses up to 1.5g/kg of body weight are safe in a professionally monitored environment.

Treatments are generally administered 2-3 times per week during active treatment, and less often during a maintenance phase. Each treatment can last between 1 and 2 hours, depending on the dose.

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Disclaimer
The OICC has prepared this monograph, as part of a series of monographs being developed to share results of a review of the research evidence related to common therapies and products used within cancer patient care. The monograph is designed to summarize evidence-based research and does not advocate for or against the use of a particular therapy. Every effort is made to ensure the information included in this monograph is accurate at the time it is published. Please note that this monograph does not include an exhaustive list of all potential adverse events; individuals may experience unique side effects. The information in this monograph should not be interpreted as medical advice nor should it replace the advice of a licensed health care provider.